A Christmas Wishlist

I finally had the chance to catch up on some reading last week, and it got me thinking about sharing this list. If you are in software development, then I would consider these four books to be required reading. I’m going to revisit this post in the future, because I’m sure there are more to add. But I wanted to start somewhere, and I’m confident about these four.

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Fonts and Frustration

TL;DR – There are a couple of XML files at the end of this post. If you regularly present technical material using SSMS, download these.

I present technical sessions now and then – my local PASS group, SQL Saturdays, internal groups at my workplace, etc. I frequently find myself adjusting the fonts inside SQL Server Management Studio to make sure my material is readable on the big screen. I’ve also been in the audience plenty of times, watching with sympathy as one of my cohorts agonizingly navigates this problem.

Usually, it goes something like this. They first find the [100%] tucked away in the lower left corner of the text window, and blow that up to 150 or 200 percent. Then they run their query to find that the results are still at 100%. So then they eventually find the Options dialog under the Tools menu, find the Fonts and Colors branch of the tree, and then groan when they realize they have to figure out which three or four of the 30 different fonts they need to change. Sometimes, they’ll give up there and just go use ZoomIt (which any good technical presenter should have available anyway), but constantly bouncing around with ZoomIt will get old quickly over the course of an hour-long session.

But if they do manage to find the right fonts to change and take a good stab at what they ought to be, they get this wonderful message:

Font Frustration

Just the thing you want to see when you already have all your demo scripts loaded, right?

Oh, and don’t forget that – when the session is over – you now have to go through the same exercise to get SSMS back where you had it before the session.

So quite a while ago, I generated a couple of .reg files for myself, one called PresentationFonts.reg and one called NormalFonts.reg. You can imagine what these did when I applied them to the Windows Registry.

That worked great… until recently. The SQL Server Tools team has done some marvelous things with SSMS lately, and I’m very happy with the changes. But take a close look at one of those things they did:

Version Information

And where does this new shell keep its settings? Here’s a hint – it’s not in the registry. It’s actually in this file:


{LocalApplicationDataPath}\Microsoft\SQL Server Management Studio\13.0\ApplicationPrivateSettings

And this file is some bizarre hybrid of XML, JSON (with JSON inside of JSON, no less!), and I don’t know what else.

Fortunately, there is an option available. Under the Tools menu, there is “Import and Export Settings…”, which gives you a wizard for importing some or all settings from an XML file. So, with that in mind, here are my files that I use.

  • PresentationFonts.vssettings – This changes the font size to 16 for Text Editor, Execution Plan, Grid Results and Text Results.
  • NormalFonts.vssettings – This changes the font size to 9 for Text Editor, Execution Plan, Grid Results and Text Results.

NOTE: When you save these, save them with the .vssettings extension. Since I’m a cheapskate and use wordpress.com to host this blog, I’m prevented from using whatever extension I want. So they’ll show up as .doc files in your download dialog, but they really are just text XML. And the Import/Export wizard looks specifically for .vssettings files.

Obviously, you may not use the same settings I do, and you’ll have to customize them for your own uses. If you change the same four that I do, then all you have to do is fiddle with the sizes in the files. If you wish to change different fonts, you’ll want to export your settings with that wizard, change the font you want, export them again, and compare the files in order to figure out which GUID is which.

In any case, I strongly recommend having a pair of files like these parked right next to your demo scripts, where you’ll remember to run them as you prepare for your session.

I know this is a rather long post for a rather small tip, but I’m amazed at just how many of us fight this problem. If I had a dollar for every time I’ve seen a presenter struggle with font sizes, my Azure subscription would be paid for.

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NULL Pain Revisited

In an earlier post, I covered an issue with special characters in Transact-SQL. I ended up creating a scalar function to handle it. Well, fast-forward a few months and now my query’s inability to go parallel is really starting to cause trouble. And, yes, scalar functions are absolutely poisonous to parallelism.

Anyway, I revisited the idea of stripping the null characters inline, rather than calling a function, and somewhere out there on the intarwebs I found this gem:


SELECT @var = REPLACE(@var COLLATE Latin1_General_BIN, NCHAR(0x00) COLLATE Latin1_General_BIN, NCHAR(9));

In my case, I’m replacing all instances with a tab character.

But I can’t find or remember where I got it! So, my sincere apologies to the real source, whoever you are. But even if I can’t claim ownership or identify the source, I still want to make sure this one’s out there for everyone else’s benefit.

Godspeed!

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Compile Time Part 2

TL;DR – Square brackets do not save the optimizer any time.

If you didn’t already read Part 1, you might want to go back and do that.

I will easily admit that I can be rather obsessive about code formatting sometimes. Frankly, inconsistency annoys me. When it comes to Transact-SQL, this can translate into all sorts of little quirks in my code. One of the latest ones is overuse of [square brackets].

They have their place, of course. There’s a reason the QUOTENAME function exists. And there will always be some annoying fool that likes to create columns with names like “name” and “type” or – worse – put actual SPACES in them!

But I’ll admit it – I’ve been getting carried away. I blame Postgres, which won’t let me use Pascal casing without throwing quotes around every identifier. But I digress…

Anyway, this obsession had me thinking – does wrapping identifiers in square brackets save SQL Server any time? Does it say to the optimizer, “Hey, I PROMISE this whole thing inside these square brackets is an identifier. Cross my heart.” And the optimizer takes your code at its word and doesn’t look through its list of reserved keywords for one that matches AccountCreateDate or address_line_2?

The answer is… no. Throwing every identifier into square brackets doesn’t speed it up at all. Here’s the test:


IF EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM sys.procedures WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID('dbo.j1'))
DROP PROCEDURE dbo.j1;
GO
CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.j1
AS
EXEC(N'DECLARE @rowguid UNIQUEIDENTIFIER; SELECT @rowguid = rowguid FROM Person.Address WHERE AddressID = 1 OPTION (RECOMPILE);');
GO

IF EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM sys.procedures WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID('dbo.j2'))
DROP PROCEDURE dbo.j2;
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.j2
AS
EXEC(N'DECLARE @rowguid UNIQUEIDENTIFIER; SELECT @rowguid = [rowguid] FROM [Person].[Address] WHERE [AddressID] = 1 OPTION (RECOMPILE);');
GO

DBCC FREEPROCCACHE;
GO

DECLARE @i INT = 1;
WHILE (@i <= 100000)
BEGIN
EXEC dbo.j1
EXEC dbo.j2
SELECT @i = @i + 1;
END;
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS 'procedure_name', total_worker_time / 1000 AS 'cpu_in_ms'
FROM sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats
WHERE object_id IN (OBJECT_ID('dbo.j1'), OBJECT_ID('dbo.j2'))
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(object_id);
GO

Note that this was written to use AdventureWorks2014. Also note that I’m running ad hoc SQL inside of a pair of stored procedures so that I can measure a very quick and small bit of SQL over a lot of executions, forcing it to recompile every time yet keeping the plan cache from blowing up. See Part 1 if you don’t believe that my ad hoc SQL’s compile time is factored into total_worker_time.

Anyway, this code takes about a minute and a half to run on my system. The results? A dead heat. Sometimes, j1 wins, and sometimes, j2 wins. There’s no significant difference.

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Compile Time Part 1

TL;DR – The sys.dm_exec_{query|procedure}_stats.*_worker_time fields do not include compile time. But the values in sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats.*_worker_time DO include compile time for ad hoc SQL within the procedures. Also, as a side note, a lot of indexed views can be a significant performance problem.

I recommend a blog post by Jonathan Kehayias entitled, “Identifying High Compile Time Statements from the Plan Cache“. In that, he’s concentrating on queries that have a high individual compile cost.

However, the object of my search was small queries being compiled and executed in high volume (more on why in Part 2 of this). In my case, I was looking for ad hoc SQL being generated and executed inside of stored procedures – the kind of queries that don’t make their way to the plan cache, often due to the use of OPTION (RECOMPILE) to keep them from spamming the cache.

What I found was that worker time needed to compile these queries is indistinguishable from that needed to execute them. To show this, let’s look at an example in AdventureWorks2014. In this example, I’m going to create and execute two similar procedures. I’m also going to create a number of indexed views.

Why indexed views? I want to increase compile time significantly for this exercise, and a large number of indexed views can do that. From MSDN: “The query optimizer may use indexed views to speed up the query execution. The view does not have to be referenced in the query for the optimizer to consider that view for a substitution.” My thanks to oas_public on stackoverflow.com for that tip.

Anyway, let’s create a stored procedure that will use our indexed view:


CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.j1
AS
BEGIN
DECLARE @stmt NVARCHAR(4000);
SELECT @stmt = N'/* dbo.j1 */
SELECT TOP 1
SUM(UnitPrice * OrderQty * (1.00 - UnitPriceDiscount)) AS Rev,
OrderDate,
ProductID
FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail AS od
INNER JOIN Sales.SalesOrderHeader AS o
ON od.SalesOrderID = o.SalesOrderID
AND ProductID BETWEEN 700 and 800
AND OrderDate >= CONVERT(datetime,''05/01/2002'',101)
GROUP BY OrderDate, ProductID
ORDER BY Rev DESC;';
EXEC(@stmt);
END; --PROCEDURE
GO

By the way, this evolved from sample code on MSDN. Now here’s a second stored procedure that is ever-so-slightly different:


CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.j1
AS
BEGIN
DECLARE @stmt NVARCHAR(4000);
SELECT @stmt = N'/* dbo.j2 */
SELECT TOP 1
SUM(UnitPrice * OrderQty * (2.00 - UnitPriceDiscount)) AS Rev,
OrderDate,
ProductID
FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail AS od
INNER JOIN Sales.SalesOrderHeader AS o
ON od.SalesOrderID = o.SalesOrderID
AND ProductID BETWEEN 700 and 800
AND OrderDate >= CONVERT(datetime,''05/01/2002'',101)
GROUP BY OrderDate, ProductID
ORDER BY Rev DESC;';
EXEC(@stmt);
END; --PROCEDURE
GO

To make this a fair test, let’s clear the cache:


DBCC FREEPROCCACHE;
GO

And execute both of the procedures:


EXEC dbo.j1;
EXEC dbo.j2;

How long did they take?


SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS 'procedure_name', total_worker_time / 1000 AS 'cpu_in_ms'
FROM sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats
WHERE object_id IN (OBJECT_ID('dbo.j1'), OBJECT_ID('dbo.j2'))
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(object_id);

On my local system, both run in about 85-105 ms. Obviously, YMMV.

Now let’s create an indexed view. I’m going to reuse this code a couple of times, so bear that in mind when you see how it’s constructed:


--Set the options to support indexed views.
SET NUMERIC_ROUNDABORT OFF;
SET ANSI_PADDING, ANSI_WARNINGS, CONCAT_NULL_YIELDS_NULL, ARITHABORT, QUOTED_IDENTIFIER, ANSI_NULLS ON;
GO

DECLARE @i INT = 1, @stmt NVARCHAR(4000), @t1 NVARCHAR(4000), @t2 NVARCHAR(4000), @t3 NVARCHAR(4000)

-- Create template for dropping the view.
SELECT @t1 = N'/* jtest */
IF OBJECT_ID(''Sales.vOrders_{1}'') IS NOT NULL
DROP VIEW Sales.vOrders_{1};';

-- Create template for creating the view.
SELECT @t2 = N'/* jtest */
CREATE VIEW Sales.vOrders_{1} WITH SCHEMABINDING
AS
SELECT
SUM(UnitPrice*OrderQty*(1.00-UnitPriceDiscount)) AS Revenue,
OrderDate,
ProductID,
COUNT_BIG(*) AS COUNT
FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail AS od
INNER JOIN Sales.SalesOrderHeader AS o
ON od.SalesOrderID = o.SalesOrderID
GROUP BY OrderDate, ProductID;';

-- Create template for creating the index.
SELECT @t3 = N'/* jtest */
CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX IDX_V1_{1}
ON Sales.vOrders_{1} (OrderDate, ProductID);';

-- Drop and create the objects.
WHILE (@i <= 1)
BEGIN
SELECT @stmt = REPLACE(@t1, N'{1}', CAST(@i AS NVARCHAR(4000)));
EXEC (@stmt);
SELECT @stmt = REPLACE(@t2, N'{1}', CAST(@i AS NVARCHAR(4000)));
EXEC (@stmt);
SELECT @stmt = REPLACE(@t3, N'{1}', CAST(@i AS NVARCHAR(4000)));
EXEC (@stmt);
SELECT @i = @i + 1;
END; --WHILE
GO

Note that the indexed view supports dbo.j1, but not dbo.j2. Let’s go back and run those again:


DBCC FREEPROCCACHE;
GO

EXEC dbo.j1;
EXEC dbo.j2;

SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS 'procedure_name', total_worker_time / 1000 AS 'cpu_in_ms'
FROM sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats
WHERE object_id IN (OBJECT_ID('dbo.j1'), OBJECT_ID('dbo.j2'))
ORDER BY OBJECT_NAME(object_id);
GO

If your results are like mine, you’ll see that dbo.j1 has dropped to about a quarter of its previous worker time, but dbo.j2 hasn’t budged. So, our indexed view is doing what we want. Now let’s create a few more. How does 500 sound? In that WHILE loop for the indexed view script, change the constant from 1 to 500 and run it again. Bear in mind, this took about 90 seconds on my system, so be prepared to wait.

Once all 500 indexed views are created, execute the two stored procedures again and look at the results. Both worker time values will be much higher!

But the actual execution time hasn’t changed. We’re still going to get essentially the same plan for each query, which means SQL Server should be doing the same work to execute it. But now the compilation is much more costly because the optimizer is looking at all 500 views when generating the plan. And because that compilation is taking place inside of ad hoc SQL in a stored procedure, SQL Server is reporting it as part of the procedure’s worker time in sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats.

To verify this, you can run Jonathan’s code, which will break out the compile time for those ad hoc queries.

If you’ve been following along in your own database and want to gracefully clean up the mess, you’ll want to do two things. First, execute this:


DROP PROCEDURE dbo.j1;
DROP PROCEDURE dbo.j2;
GO

And second, go back to the indexed view script, comment or remove the last two EXEC lines, and run it again.

In conclusion, the *_worker_time fields in sys.dm_exec_query_stats and sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats do NOT include compile time. That was why Jonathan had to dig into the cached plan and tease that information out of the XML. But the compile time of ad hoc statements inside of a stored procedure WILL be included in the procedure’s execution time.

And too many indexed views can suck.

Stay tuned for Part 2, which explains why I chased this down in the first place.

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IndyPASS is going Back to School

Yes, I’ve been quiet on this blog forever. That’ll change soon. I’ve been working on a couple of topics that I think may be of use to people other than me.

But in the meantime, I’m presenting “Back to School: Query and Execution Plan Fundamentals” tomorrow night at the monthly IndyPASS meeting. Think of it like a SQL 101 for developers. Come join us for some free pizza and a little bit of learning.

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NULL Pain

I had an issue today that resulted in a tweet to #sqlhelp:

#sqlhelp See Remarks section: http://ow.ly/Za6HX So how do you strip out 0x000? Suggestions?

As it turns out, when you have a character string in SQL Server that contains character 0x000, it really doesn’t know what to do with it most of the time, especially when you’re dealing with Unicode strings.

I did track down http://sqlsolace.blogspot.com/2014/07/function-dbostripunwantedcharacters.html, but I generally try to avoid calling UDF’s in my queries.

I ended up settling on this, which is based on the fact that REPLACE() works when the data is ASCII

CASE WHEN LEN(REPLACE(CAST([foo] AS VARCHAR(4000)), CHAR(0), '')) = LEN([foo]) THEN [foo] ELSE [dbo].[strip_char0]([foo], NCHAR(9)) END

My strip_char0 function was mostly like the one from sqlsolace, so I won’t repeat it here. But I did add in a replacement character option (in this example, a tab). And I’m only calling the UDF when I need to, which makes the performance geek in me happy.

My thanks to @SQLSoldier for being responsive on the #sqlhelp hashtag.

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